More than ever, businesses need to build and maintain an online brand. Once this only applied to certain industries or giant companies. Nowadays even your local bakery more than likely has a brand strategy of some kind. Today we’ll look into one way to get started with yours in our Awario review.

Obviously the first step towards building a great online brand is to know what people think of you. This means monitoring your mentions on social media. You’ll also want to get an idea of who’s talking about you, so you can be sure you’re reaching the right demographics. This is called social listening.

Once you know if you’re getting to the right people with the right message you can tweak your approach. Even then, you’ll want to carry on your listening efforts to make sure the changes to your approach have the desired effect.

What is Awario?

I’m sure you can see where this is going. That’s right, Awario is, at least at heart, a social listening tool. More on its other functions later, but its MO is allowing you to track and monitor how your brand is perceived online.

There are two tiers to this. Both work by keeping track of mentions of your brand name or other determined keywords. Firstly, you can monitor these mentions in real time across the major social networks, as well as blogs, news site, and Reddit.

Awario review

Secondly, there’s a suite of analytics which let’s you track key metrics like growth rate and overall reach. I was somewhat surprised during this Awario review by the built-in sentiment analysis. This automatically sorts all mentions into ‘positive’, ‘negative’ or ‘neutral’, which is a particularly useful feature.

This all happens from a really easily navigable central dashboard. You simply switch between ‘Mentions’ and ‘Reports’ in the side bar to move from real time monitoring to analytics. That’s what I like to call an idiot-proof UI.

Awario review

Additional Features

I think focusing too greatly on social listening in this Awario review would be a bit of a short-sell. This may sound like an odd thing to say. Really what I mean is that Awario also dips its toes into a few other marketing areas.

Now of course, these all still tie in with listening to some degree. One good example of what I mean here is Awario’s use as a tool for managing influencer and blogger outreach.

For whatever terms you’re tracking, Awario will tell you the most influential people who mention these. This is important information to have at hand when you’re considering which bloggers to reach out too, especially as follower counts are increasingly untrustworthy.

Awario also offers great potential as a lead generation tool. When searching for brand and keyword mentions, the platform automatically identifies requests for recommendations.

It then gives you a realtime feed of sales opportunities. All you have to do is responds. This almost feels like an unfair advantage to me.

Awario review

As far as usage, the standout feature of this Awario review is the ability to use Boolean search functions. For the non-tech types out there, this means that you can use certain qualifiers between search terms.

This might look something like X and (Y or Z) as a basic example. That might not sound earth shattering, but it will save you massive amount of time trying every possible combination of terms.

Awario review

There are other features which seem designed to help consultants or marketing managers impress their clients and higher-ups. Awario’s enterprise subscription comes with automatic reporting.

With this, you simply select which metrics you’d like to include in your report, and what time scale you want. It then creates branded and formatted reports for you automatically. For those of use with lesser design skills, that could potentially save days of work.

Awario review

Problems

We come to the section of this Awario review where I air my grievances. Did I have issues? Sort of. At least I encountered one small problem, and I can see one potentially big improvement.

In fact, the issue isn’t really a fault of Awario. When I was playing around with with company names and keywords, I found that in many cases I was being drowned out by mentions of other companies. Especially those operating in bigger markets.

Of course, better usage of the Boolean searches could probably solve this in most cases. Still, what it points to is that users will still need to have done their keyword homework thoroughly.

And my improvement? Well, at the core of this I’d like to see more third-party integrations. I think with this, along with its existing lead generation tools, Awario could be a complete game changer.

Then you could have a tool which identifies posts looking for recommendations, and have this feed into your social media automator to send out a set response. Or even better, it could be integrated with a third-party chatbot or AI.

Then your sales team would be laughing all the way to the bank.

Awario Review: Final Verdict

So what’s the good word on Awario? I think it has a massive amount of potential. With its ease-of-use and scope of features, I think this is doubly true for non-marketing specialists looking to get their feet wet with social listening. Speaking of which, I’d like to wrap up with a special mention to their proprietary training guide.

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Published by Ronan McQuilan

I'm a specialist technology copywriter and blogger, originally from Belfast in Ireland. When I'm not writing about software, I'm also a massive folk music nerd.